SinHei Kwok Rethinks Multi-Family Housing in Phoenix

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SinHei Kwok Rethinks Multi-Family Housing in Phoenix
SinHei Kwok Rethinks Multi-Family Housing in Phoenix

SinHei Kwok rethinks apartment buildings in Phoenix © Roehner + Ryan Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps: //www.archdaily.com/971784/sinhei-kwok-rethinks-multi-family-housing-in-phoenixArchitect and developer SinHei Kwok has Polker, a apartment building with six units in the Garfield Historic District near downtown Phoenix, Arizona. With two bedrooms and loft-style apartments, the project rethinks the surrounding context of single-family homes. Polker offers a new type of living for city dwellers who do not want to live in a single-family house or a large box apartment, but want to live and work closer to the city center. + 23 © Roehner + RyanPolker should make sense of the community. Phoenix is ​​notorious for its single-family housing sprawl since the 1950s. In response to this unsustainable phenomenon, SinHei took a different approach and, as the owner / builder, decided to create a higher density apartment building on a typical residential lot size (140’x50 ‘). With a denser development, this project served as a prototype of an urban infill development to build a sustainable, walkable city. © Roehner + Ryan © Roehner + RyanInspired by 100-year-old pyramid houses in the historic neighborhood, the mass of the building takes clues from the surrounding context with the same saddle roof shape. With the loft-like units, the typical monopitch attic became a creative loft space. All units are connected to individual shaded outdoor terraces with sliding doors to bring the outdoor experience into the interior. A light shaft is introduced at the corner of the loft units to bring a second source of natural light into the bathroom, loft area and communal area. © Roehner + Ryan © Roehner + RyanSinHei also reinterpreted the iconic porches of the historic Garfield district. The approach kept the same concept of the porch and encouraged residents to meet and interact with their neighbors. This porch is constructed with a 30 foot wide cantilevered concrete slab. At night, it becomes a floating porch with LED lights glowing under the ceiling. Exterior grade aluminum composite panels were used to give a clean, modern look while eliminating seams. Inspired by Chinese landscape paintings, the horizontal shape of the window facing west captures the ever-changing skyline of the inner city and at the same time limits the heat absorption by the summer sun.

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